lohrien:

Illustrations by Lucy Yu

(via mattrn)

spindlebug:

woah finally finished this thing

spindlebug:

woah finally finished this thing

(Source: flowergoose, via scientificillustration)

amnhnyc:

Until the early 1900s the world relied on painstakingly created woodcuts, engravings, and lithographs to catch a glimpse of the fascinating plants and animals explorers were encountering on their far-flung journeys across the globe.

Here’s a sneak peek at Natural Histories: 400 Years of Scientific Illustrations from the Museum’s Librarya new exhibition opening at the Museum next month. See even more images here.

(via scientificillustration)

mucholderthen:

Charlotte Hartle
"The Pollinators" Watercolor, 2012
(Charlotte Hartle Illustration)

mucholderthen:

Charlotte Hartle

"The Pollinators"
Watercolor, 2012

(Charlotte Hartle Illustration)

(via scientificillustration)

Kirk Johnson, Fossil and Walrus Guy

What subject, other than your work, do you know the most about? Walrus. I once saw a herd of 10,000 walrus at a place called Round Island in Alaska, and I have been obsessed with them ever since. Here’s an animal with three-foot-long teeth that eats nothing but clams and floats around on slabs of ice. I am a font of walrus trivia.
~"Meet the Smithsonian’s Fossil Guy" by Al Kamen, The Washington Post
The loss of sea ice in the Arctic is seriously affecting creatures from the algae bloom and zooplankton copepods at the base of the food chain to giant fauna like walrus and polar bears.

Walrus forage for food in shallow waters, and use the sea ice to rest, and to dive from, between foraging. As the ice melts and retreats from the shoreline the ice edge moves over deeper waters, and the walrus community increasingly has to crowd together on the shoreline rather than the ice, making the spread of infection easier, and increasing the dangers of trampling for the young.

(Photo: Joel Garlich-Miller/U.S. Fish and Wildlife)

The loss of sea ice in the Arctic is seriously affecting creatures from the algae bloom and zooplankton copepods at the base of the food chain to giant fauna like walrus and polar bears.

Walrus forage for food in shallow waters, and use the sea ice to rest, and to dive from, between foraging. As the ice melts and retreats from the shoreline the ice edge moves over deeper waters, and the walrus community increasingly has to crowd together on the shoreline rather than the ice, making the spread of infection easier, and increasing the dangers of trampling for the young.
(Photo: Joel Garlich-Miller/U.S. Fish and Wildlife)
"Most people begin to recognize their sexual orientation when they are just kids, when they are young and vulnerable like this little girl. So when we, in the Church, discuss homosexuality as though it were an issue faced by “other people” who are “out there,” when we resort to stereotypes and language about hell and judgment and damnation, we may be doing serious damage to the most precious and vulnerable among us. Even our casual conversations with one another can be picked up by little ears and internalized in destructive ways. We must never forget that there are kids struggling with the implications of their sexuality in our pews, in our classrooms, and at our own kitchen tables."

If my son or daughter were gay… (via azspot)

(via girlwithalessonplan)

Love those ears and that face!

animalfunwithnature:

Big Ear Puppy by: (Thomas Retterath) 
Love those ears and that face!

animalfunwithnature:

Big Ear Puppy by: (Thomas Retterath

The African Wild Dog is in serious decline, and the reasons are complex and many; for a start wild dogs are rare, and increasingly under pressure from humans – often killed in wire snares set by poachers, or killed by game farmers. The species have now been eradicated from 25 of the 39 countries that formed its historical range, and now they can now only be found in pockets of southern and eastern Africa. However, Lions are also one of the main causes of adult pup mortality, and the wild dog is now the most endangered carnivore in Africa with total numbers of around 6,600 individuals of which only 1,400 are mature – according IUCN’s latest 2012 estimate. 
*
According to the Botswana Predator Conservation Trust the cooperative hunting is likely to be the main reason why the Wild Dog is the most effective hunter in Africa in terms of kills to hunting attempts: Wild Dogs: 44%, Cheetahs 41%, Spotted Hyenas 35%, Lions 27%.

Gorgeous photos of African wild dogs as well a good article about their conservation status and social behavior, both by photographer Bjorn Olesen. He also has a gallery of the photos on his website.
The African Wild Dog is in serious decline, and the reasons are complex and many; for a start wild dogs are rare, and increasingly under pressure from humans – often killed in wire snares set by poachers, or killed by game farmers. The species have now been eradicated from 25 of the 39 countries that formed its historical range, and now they can now only be found in pockets of southern and eastern Africa. However, Lions are also one of the main causes of adult pup mortality, and the wild dog is now the most endangered carnivore in Africa with total numbers of around 6,600 individuals of which only 1,400 are mature – according IUCN’s latest 2012 estimate.
*
According to the Botswana Predator Conservation Trust the cooperative hunting is likely to be the main reason why the Wild Dog is the most effective hunter in Africa in terms of kills to hunting attempts: Wild Dogs: 44%, Cheetahs 41%, Spotted Hyenas 35%, Lions 27%.
Gorgeous photos of African wild dogs as well a good article about their conservation status and social behavior, both by photographer Bjorn Olesen. He also has a gallery of the photos on his website.

(Source: winterfel, via brodyface)